Friday, November 20, 2009

Commonwealth Bank Spit Junction

Commonwealth Bank Spit Junction
The Commonwealth Bank at 58 Spit Road in Spit Junction is another Art Deco gem built in 1935 by Messrs Hutcherson Bros of Stanmore Road, Petersham and supervised by the Department of the Interior, Works and Services Branch of NSW. It was completed in August 1935.

During work in 1978 the exterior ‘cantilevered’ awning was extended across and above the main entrance of the branch. The branch closed in April 1998.

Thankfully the awning was subsequently removed much to the benefit of the building.

Facade detail

Branch facade detail

The branch in 1977

The branch in 1977

The branch in 1978

The branch in 1978

The branch in 1992

The branch in 1992

Source - Commonwealth Bank Archives Department





More Art Deco inforamtion can be found on the DecoWorks Pty Ltd website.

Commonwealth Bank - Town Hall

Commonwealth Bank - Town Hall
Since 1911 the Commonwealth Bank Town Hall site at 546 George Street in Sydney was a retail outlet for furnishing retailer Morley Johnsons. An additional two floors were added to the building around 1938 and Art Deco syled fluting added to the facade.

When Morley Johnsons closed their doors they sold the building to the Commonwealth Bank in 1964. The Commonwealth Bank has maintained a branch there ever since.

Facade detail

Commonwealth Bank - Town Hall facade detail

Before (circa 1930s) and after (circa 1960s

Town Hall branch historical photo




More Art Deco inforamtion can be found on the DecoWorks Pty Ltd website.

Thursday, November 19, 2009

QBE Building

QBE Building
The QBE building at 80-82A Pitt Street in the Sydney CBD was previously known as Bryant House which was built for the City Mutual Life Assurance Association as an investment property.

The building was designed by Emil Sodersten in association with T. W. Hodgson and Sons and was constructed by Hutcherson Bros in 1939.

The building features an unusual serrated facade of textured face brick above a polished granite plinth with simple Art Deco mouldings. The original Art Deco detailing of the entry foyer and lift lobby remains intact.

Facade detail

QBE facade detail

Window detail

QBE window detail

Source Sydney Heritage Listings




More Art Deco information can be found on the DecoWorks Pty Ltd website.

Wednesday, November 18, 2009

Luna Park

Luna Park
Luna Park at 1 Olympic Drive in Milson's Point is one of Sydney Harbour's major landmarks and is a rare surviving example of an amusement park and fantasy architecture in the Art Deco idiom of the 1930s. The towers, more than any other feature of the park, epitomised the then fashionable Art Deco style of architecture, emphasised by the innovative and exciting lighting effects.

The first entrance to Luna Park was constructed by Stuart Bros in 1935 to a design by Rupert Browne, based on his entrance to Melbourne's Luna Park at St Kilda. The original entrance and famous face were remodelled in 1939, 1947, 1953, 1960 and again in 1973.

The twin towers have scalloped spires obviously influenced by the design of the Chrysler Building in New York, a masterpiece of Art Deco and the tallest building in the world when it was erected in 1930.

More detailed information on the history of Luna Park can found following the "source" link below.

Entrance tower detail

Entrance tower detail

Source Sydney Heritage Listings




More Art Deco information can be found on the DecoWorks Pty Ltd website.

Asbestos House

Asbestos House
Asbestos House at 65-69 York Street in the Sydney CBD was designed by Robertson and Marks in association with John Reid and Sons in 1927.

It was planned in two parts; the first was completed in 1928-29, and the second in 1934-35 to a design by the same architects.

The building was praised for its delicate colouring (external terracotta) and its harmonious design.

Also known as James Hardy House, the building is listed in the RAIA Registry of Significant 20th Century Buildings.

York Street entrance

York Street entrance

Source Sydney Heritage Listings




More Art Deco information can be found on the DecoWorks Pty Ltd website.

ANZAC War Memorial

ANZAC War Memorial
The ANZAC War Memorial in Sydney's Hyde Park South is aesthetically significant as the finest work of architect C. Bruce Dellit and is one of the finest examples of interwar Stripped Classical and Art Deco styles in Australia.

It is also an examplar of the work of the most renowned Australian sculptor of the time, Rayner Hoff. It was built by Kell & Rigby builders in 1933-1934.

The stepped pyramid design on the roof is a signature of Dellit's work. This design is reflected in the ceiling of the chapel in Kinselas Hotel just up the road on Taylor square.

Facade detail

War memorial detail

Source Sydney Heritage Listings





More Art Deco information can be found on the DecoWorks Pty Ltd website.

Sydney Harbour Bridge


Listed in the RAIA Register of Significant 20th Century Buildings the Harbour Bridge at Milson's Point in Sydney was finished in 1932 and was designed by JJ Bradfield and Sir Ralph Freeman.

The design of the impressive 89 metre high pylons, which are primarily decorative, was undertaken by the consulting architects, Sir John Burnet and Partners of London. Thomas Tait, the architect who carried out the work, produced a stripped classical treatment with strong Art Deco components. They are made of concrete, faced with granite, quarried near Moruya, where about 250 Australian, Scottish and Italian stonemasons and their families lived in a temporary settlement. Three ships were specifically built to carry the 18,000 cubic metres of cut, dressed and numbered granite blocks, 300km north to Sydney.

Sources
- Sydney Harbour Bridge
- Sydney Heritage Listings - detailed




More Art Deco information can be found on the DecoWorks Pty Ltd website.